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Wiley partnership with figshare enables data sharing

Library Technology Reports - 18 min 41 sec ago
(June 30, 2015). Wiley announced their partnership with London- based data repository organization, Figshare. To support authors who wish to openly share their data, Wiley have embarked on this partnership with Figshare to integrate data sharing within existing journal workflows and article publication.
Categories: Library News

The Respond! College chooses Koha, supported by Interleaf Technology

Library Technology Reports - 18 min 41 sec ago
(June 30, 2015). The Respond! College has chosen the Koha open source library management system to automate its library service. Interleaf Technology has been contracted to implement the Koha system and to provide on-going support services.
Categories: Library News

NISO Elects New Vice Chair and Directors to Serve Community

Library Technology Reports - 18 min 41 sec ago
(June 30, 2015). The membership of the National Information Standards Organization has elected new leadership for the 2015-2016 term that begins on July 1, 2015. Mike Teets, Executive Director, Strategy, Governance & Architecture at OCLC, who was elected last year and has served as Vice Chair during the current term, will become Chair of NISO for the 2015-16 term. B. Tommie Usdin, President of Mulberry Technologies, Inc., has been elected to serve as Vice Chair of the NISO Board of Directors.
Categories: Library News

Malaysia Institute for Research in Youth Development selects Virtua

Library Technology Reports - 18 min 41 sec ago
(June 25, 2015). Innovative announced that Malaysia Institute for Research in Youth Development has selected Virtua. A national research center under the Ministry of Youth and Sports, the library has approximately 2,000 items in its collection and this is its first library-automation system.
Categories: Library News

Springer journals increase impact factors in 2014

Library Technology Reports - 3 hours 19 min ago
(June 30, 2015). The Journal Citation Reports 2015, released by Thomson Reuters, lists a total of 1,595 Springer journals, with 37 Springer journals joining the list for the first time. Significantly, in 2014, 82 percent of the Springer journals in the list were cited more frequently than in the previous year. Well over one half (57 percent) of Springer journals increased their impact factor in 2014 over the 2013 figure.
Categories: Library News

Koha development initiative receives international support

Library Technology Reports - 3 hours 19 min ago
(June 30, 2015). ByWater Solutions thanks Bohdan Šmilauer, a librarian in Prague, for his contribution to the Professional Cataloging interface development for Koha.
Categories: Library News

ALA appoints Jenny Levine next LITA Executive Director

Library Technology Reports - 3 hours 19 min ago
(June 30, 2015). The American Library Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Jenny Levine as the Executive Director of the Library and Information Technology Association, a division of the ALA, effective August 3, 2015. Ms. Levine has been at the American Library Association since 2006 as the Strategy Guide in ALA's Information Technology and Telecommunications Services area, charged with providing vision and leadership regarding emerging technologies, development of services, and integration of those services into association and library environments.
Categories: Library News

Ex Libris Alma early-adopter program launched in Israel

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 20 min ago
(June 30, 2015). Ex Libris announced the launch of an early-adopter program in Israel for the Ex Libris Alma library services platform. Eight top institutions of higher education are participating: the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University, the University of Haifa, the College of Management—Academic Studies, IDC Herzliya, Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Oranim Academic College of Education, and the Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art. Four of the colleges belong to the 47 member Israel College Consortium. All the early adopters will be migrating from the Ex Libris Aleph library management system to Alma, which they will use in combination with the Primo discovery and delivery solution to reap the benefits of an integrated, end-to-end system.
Categories: Library News

APA Makes E-books Available through EBSCO eBooks

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 20 min ago
(June 30, 2015). The American Psychological Association is making its e-books available to libraries on the EBSCO eBooks platform. The agreement with EBSCO Information Services gives libraries cost-effective access to in-demand psychology, behavioral sciences and social sciences titles.
Categories: Library News

Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust [EAST] launches: Large Shared Print initiative across libraries in the Northeast focuses on ensuring access to Ssholarly materials

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 20 min ago
(June 30, 2015). The Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust, a major new shared print initiative, launches on July 1st with important grant support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Davis Educational Foundation. The 47 member libraries of EAST, across New England, New York and Pennsylvania, will collaborate to retain agreed upon titles in their local circulating collections as well as make them available to lend to other EAST members, thereby ensuring continued access to the scholarly record of print monographs and journals.
Categories: Library News

Gale Collaborates with Google to Channel Content and Technology Directly into Student Workflow and Classroom Learning

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 20 min ago
(June 30, 2015). With plans to better connect research technology into user workflow, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, announced its certified status as a Google for Education Partner, and the integration of Google tools into Gale products. Users are now able to seamlessly login to their school or library's Gale In Context resource using Google Account credentials and to easily download, save and share articles using Google Apps for Education including Drive and Docs. With more than 40 million Google Apps for Education users worldwide, the partnership offers tremendous potential to improve student learning.
Categories: Library News

Gale collaborates with Google to channel content and technology directly into student workflow and classroom learning

Library Technology Reports - 6 hours 20 min ago
(June 30, 2015). With plans to better connect research technology into user workflow, Gale, a part of Cengage Learning, today announced its certified status as a Google for Education Partner, and the integration of Google tools into Gale products. Users are now able to seamlessly login to their school or library's Gale In Context resource using Google Account credentials and to easily download, save and share articles using Google Apps for Education including Drive and Docs. With more than 40 million Google Apps for Education users worldwide, the partnership offers tremendous potential to improve student learning.
Categories: Library News

ALA appoints Jenny Levine next LITA Executive Director

LITA Blog - 8 hours 49 min ago

The American Library Association is pleased to announce the appointment of Jenny Levine as the Executive Director of the Library and Information Technology Association, a division of the ALA, effective August 3, 2015. Ms. Levine has been at the American Library Association since 2006 as the Strategy Guide in ALA’s Information Technology and Telecommunications Services area, charged with providing vision and leadership regarding emerging technologies, development of services, and integration of those services into association and library environments. In that role she coordinated development of ALA’s collaborative workspace, ALA Connect, and provided ongoing support and documentation. She convened the staff Social Media Working Group and coordinated a team-based approach for strategic posting to ALA’s social media channels. In addition, she has been the staff liaison to ALA’s Games and Gaming Round Table (GameRT) and coordinated a range of activities, including the 2007 & 2008 Gaming, Learning, and Libraries Symposia and International Games Day @ your library. She developed the concept for and manages the Networking Uncommons gathering space at ALA conferences.

Prior to joining the ALA staff, Jenny Levine held positions as Internet Development Specialist and Strategy Guide at the Metropolitan Library System in Burr Ridge (IL), Technology Coordinator at the Grande Prairie Public Library District in Hazel Crest (IL), and Reference Librarian at the Calumet City Public Library in Calumet City (IL). She received the 2004 Illinois Library Association Technical Services Award and a 1999 Illinois Secretary of State Award of Recognition.

Jenny has an M.L.S. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and a B.S. in Journalism/Broadcast News from the University of Kansas, Lawrence. Within ALA, she is a member of LITA, GameRT, the Intellectual Freedom Round Table (IFRT), and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT). She is also active outside ALA and belongs to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the ALA-tied Freedom to Read Foundation (FTRF), the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and the Illinois Library Association (ILA).

Jenny Levine has been an active presenter and writer, including three issues of Library Technology Reports on Gaming & Libraries. Among the early explorers of Library 2.0 technologies, from the Librarians’ Site du Jour (the first librarian blog) to the ongoing The Shifted Librarian, she is active in a wide variety of social media.

Ms. Levine becomes executive director of LITA on the retirement of Mary Taylor, LITA executive director since 2001. Thanks go to the search committee for a thoughtful and successful process: Rachel Vacek, Thomas Dowling, Andromeda Yelton, Isabel Gonzalez-Smith, Keri Cascio, Dan Hoppe and Mary Ghikas.

Categories: Library News

2015 LITA Forum, Registration Opens!

LITA Blog - Mon, 2015-06-29 13:00

Registration Now Open!

2015 LITA Forum
Minneapolis, MN
November 12-15, 2015

Plan now to join us in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis for the 2015 LITA Forum, a three-day educational event that includes 2 preconferences, 3 keynote sessions, more than 55 concurrent sessions and 15 plus poster presentations.

2015 LITA Forum is the 18th annual gathering of technology-minded information professionals and is a highly regarded annual event for those involved in new and leading edge technologies in the library and information technology field. Registration is limited in order to preserve the important networking advantages of a smaller conference. Attendees take advantage of the informal Friday evening reception, networking dinners and other social opportunities to get to know colleagues and speakers. Comments from past attendees:

  • “Best conference I’ve been to in terms of practical, usable ideas that I can implement at my library.”
  • “I get so inspired by the presentations and conversations with colleagues who are dealing with the same sorts of issues that I am.”
  • “After LITA I return to my institution excited to implement solutions I find here.”
  • “This is always the most informative conference! It inspires me to develop new programs and plan initiatives.”

This Year’s featured Keynote Sessions

Mx A. Matienzo
Director of Technology for the Digital Public Library of America, he focuses on promoting and establishing digital library interoperability at an international scale. Prior to joining DPLA, Matienzo worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the Yale University Library, The New York Public Library, and the American Institute of Physics.

Carson Block
Carson Block Consulting Inc. has led, managed, and supported library technology efforts for more than 20 years. He has been called “a geek who speaks English” and enjoys acting as a bridge between the worlds of librarians and hard-core technologists.

Lisa Welchman
President of Digital Governance Solutions at ActiveStandards. In a 20-year career, Lisa Welchman has paved the way in the discipline of digital governance, helping organizations stabilize their complex, multi-stakeholder digital operations. Her book Managing Chaos: Digital Governance by Design was published in February of 2015 by Rosenfeld Media.

The Preconference Workshops include

So You Want to Make a Makerspace: Strategic Leadership to support the Integration of new and disruptive technologies into Libraries: Practical Tips, Tricks, Strategies, and Solutions for bringing making, fabrication and content creation to your library.
Presenters:
Leah Kraus is the Director of Community Engagement and Experience at the Fayetteville Free Library.
Michael Cimino is the Technology Innovation and Integration Specialist at the Fayetteville Free Library.

Beyond Web Page Analytics: Using Google tools to assess searcher behavior across web properties
Presenters:
Rob Nunez, Robert L Nunez, Head of Collection Services, Kenosha Public Library, Kenosha, WI
Keven Riggle, Systems Librarian & Webmaster, Marquette University Libraries

Visit http://litaforum.org
for registration and additional information.

Join us in Minneapolis!

Categories: Library News

3 Tips for Tech Empathy

LITA Blog - Mon, 2015-06-29 10:00

I recently participated in a training session about empathy, led by our wonderful Staff Development Specialist here at the Martin County Library System. The goal of this session was to define empathy and discuss how to show empathy for our patrons and co-workers. It got me thinking about empathy in regards to teaching technology. I frequently work with library patrons who are frustrated with technology. Many of these patrons are older adults who feel handicapped because they were not raised in the digital age.

I, on the other hand, was born born in the digital age. I learned how to use a computer in elementary school and technology has been present in my life ever since. It’s easy to forget this advantage and lose patience when you are teaching someone with a different background. In teaching classes and offering one-on-one technology help, I’ve picked up a few tips about how to empathize with your students.

If you find your patience wearing thin, think of a time when you struggled to learn something. For me, it’s learning to drive stick. I’ve tried several times and each attempt was more frustrating than the last. When I think about how nerve-wracking it is to be behind the wheel with my hand on the stick shift, I remember how scary it can be to learn something new. I often help patrons who have purchased a new device (iPad, smartphone, etc.) and they are terrified to do the wrong thing. Returning to my adventures with manual transmissions helps me understand where they’re coming from.

I was teaching a class a few weeks back and one patron was really struggling to keep up with the group. I started to get irritated by her constant questions, until halfway through when I realized that she looked exactly like my aunt. This immediately snapped me back to reality. If my aunt walked into a library I would want her to receive the best customer service possible and be treated with the utmost respect. My patience was instantly renewed, and I’ve used this trick successfully several times since by comparing patrons to my grandparents, parents, etc. Empathy is often defined as putting yourself in the other person’s shoes, but putting a loved one in the other person’s shoes can also do the trick.

I often hear the same complaints from patrons who are frustrated, confused, or overwhelmed by technology. I’ll admit it can be trying to listen to the same thing again and again, but I also recognize that listening to these grievances is very important. Sometimes it’s best to get those frustrations out right off the bat in order to set them aside and focus on learning. Listening is one of our best tools, and acknowledging that someone’s problem is valid can also be extremely helpful.

Do you have any tips for tech empathy?

Categories: Library News

Now you see it: How the brain science of attention will transform the way we live, work, and learn – A TTW Guest Post by William Bejarano

Tame the Web - Sun, 2015-06-28 14:57

As part of Michael Stephens’ Hyperlinked Library course offered through San Jose State University, I reported on the book Now you see it: How the brain science of attention will transform the way we live, work, and learn, by Cathy N. Davidson. We were encouraged to use creative means to convey our reports, so I took the book’s central theme to heart and utilized several free and available web tools to comment across platforms.

Part 1: TameTheWeb – “Introduction”

The main thrust of this book is the notion that we are using outdated criteria to measure our educational progress. This is a crucial idea for information professionals to understand, because it attempts to call our attention to the largely invisible shift in how we find, absorb, and utilize information, which could be changing the very idea of what we consider valuable.

Given that much of the book is dedicated to questioning and possibly dismantling the argument that distractions and periodic attention shifts are a bad thing, I’ve decided to create a distraction-heavy presentation with different points presented on separate formats. If the author is correct in her assessment of how users absorb information, then anyone reading this book report will likely be checking Twitter and Tumblr (among other things) before getting to the end of it anyway. By appearing on all of these platforms, I hope to stay a step or two ahead of you!

(For you traditionalists who prefer to have everything in one place, the entire script is available at the very bottom of this post, in one big text-heavy entry).

Part 2: Screencast – “The Gorilla Illusion”

http://www.screencast.com/t/nQEWNZGuK

Part 3: Tumblr – “Distraction as an Asset”

http://hyperbill.tumblr.com/post/109733910521/distraction-as-an-asset

Part 4: Slideshare – “Fighting Gravity”

http://www.slideshare.net/hyperBill/part4-slideshare-44127214

Part 5: Twitter/Storify – “Using Hyperlinks for Good”

https://storify.com/hyperBill_287/using-hyperlinks-for-good

Part 6: Soundcloud – “Conclusion”

https://soundcloud.com/bill-133/bookreview-conclusion

William Bejarano has worked as Information Specialist at the Rutgers Center of Alcohol Studies Library since 2013. Prior to that, he worked in Technical Services at the Rutgers University Libraries for eight years. He holds a Masters in Employment and Labor Relations and will complete his MLIS degree in July 2015. You can email him at bejarano@rutgers.edu.

Introduction

The main thrust of this book is the idea that we are using outdated criteria to measure our educational progress. This is a crucial idea for information professionals to understand, because it attempts to call our attention to the largely invisible shift in how we find, absorb, and utilize information, which could be changing the very idea of what we consider valuable.

Given that much of the book is dedicated to questioning and possibly dismantling the argument that distractions and periodic attention shifts are a bad thing, I’ve decided to create a distraction-heavy presentation with different points presented on separate formats. If the author is correct in her assessment of how users absorb information, then anyone reading this book report will likely be checking Twitter, Tumblr, and Youtube (among other things) before getting to the end of it anyway. By appearing on all of these platforms, I hope to stay a step or two ahead of you!

 

Screencast – “The Gorilla Illusion”

Davidson mentions that the average viewer of a television commercial pays attention to about 6.5 seconds of it (Davidson, 2011, p.24). Advertisers are keenly aware of this fact, so they are sure to target those 6.5 seconds as the ones that they want the viewer to remember. This is a consequence of “attention blindness,” one of the main ideas in this book. I hope to capture your attention for slightly more than 6.5 seconds per platform, but that’s ultimately up to you.

The metaphor that Davidson returns to throughout this book is the “Gorilla Illusion”. Please take a look at the following video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-cl=85114404&x-yt-ts=1422579428&v=vJG698U2Mvo#t=10

Okay, maybe you’ve seen or heard of this before, or maybe calling it the “Gorilla Illusion” tipped you off. If so, please try again with this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?x-yt-ts=1422579428&x-yt-cl=85114404&v=IGQmdoK_ZfY

 

Tumblr – “Distraction as an Asset”

The point is, when we choose to intently focus on something, we are making a deliberate decision not to focus on other things. Our brains develop by constantly making neural connections — choosing to stress one thing over another. In so doing, we are prioritizing what is important to us, and making sense of our world. As small children, we have not yet forged these connections, and as such the world is a confusing mass of stimuli, with no way of sorting out any patterns or distinctions between them. Therefore, in order to make sense of our world, our unique environment intentionally or unintentionally places values on some things, while (again, intentionally or unintentionally) devaluing others. We forge our neurons in whichever way is most valuable to us, and let the rest fade into obsolescence.

This is where distraction becomes kind of an asset. As Davidson puts it,

Without distraction, without being forced into an awareness of disruption and difference, we might not ever realize that we are paying attention in a certain way. We might think we’re simply experiencing all the world there is. We learn our patterns of attention so efficiently that we don’t even know they are patterns. We believe they are the world, not a limited pattern representing the part of the world that has been made meaningful to us at a given time. Only when we are disrupted by something different from our expectations do we become aware of the blind spots that we cannot see on our own (p.56).

 

Slideshare – “Fighting Gravity”

A common question in the popular media, in academia, and in the business world is whether a hyperlinked approach to information gathering, distribution, and/or retrieval bad for us? Bad for our brains? Bad for our children? (oh, won’t someone please think of the children?) But, as this book makes clear, this is the wrong question to be asking. Instead, the question we should be asking ourselves is whether or not we are learning in a way that will best prepare ourselves for the way the world works. This leads us to approaching the topic from a very different perspective. This slight tweak is just what Davidson means by “attention blindness”. We’re devoting all this energy, angst, and research into something that in the end may not be something we even have any control over.

Excuse the hyperbole for a moment, but asking if the Internet is bad for us is about as meaningless as asking if gravity is bad for us. It does not really matter, because it is simply here, it is central to our lives, and it does not appear to be going anywhere. Davidson points out that in the ten years prior to the book’s publication we had gone from spending 2.7 hours per week online, to over 18 hours per week (Davidson, 2011, p.7). This book was published in 2011, and technology use seems to be increasing exponentially, so it wouldn’t surprise me if that number were dwarfed by our current usage, just four years later. In light of this rapid adoption, we can either spend our time proverbially fighting gravity, or we can learn to accept that it is here to stay, and work with its potential and deal with its consequences.

 

Twitter/Storify – “Using Hyperlinks for Good”

This report was prepared for Michael Stephens’ course The Hyperlinked Library at San Jose State University. For the sake of this argument, let’s accept it.

Instead of focusing on what the internet is doing to our brains, let us delve into how we can use it to our advantage in the library profession. As one specific example from the text, comes in the way of crowdsourcing. Surely you have heard of the term crowdsourcing by this point. If you have not, here is the Wikipedia entry for it:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crowdsourcing (Do you see what I did there?)

In a nutshell, it is the process of harnessing large crowds in order to complete large or complex tasks, often without any real form of central control. While we as information specialists may be the authority, the users (whomever they may be) will ultimately determine where libraries are heading, because they are the ones who are using (or not using) them. We need to hear from our users, which requires not only surveys and exit interviews, but perpetual connection with real communication to our users, whose needs have exploded beyond the traditional reference questions or information literacy issues.

 

SoundCloud – “Conclusion”

The great paradox here is that as jobs get more technically oriented, that which is uniquely human becomes more revered. Creativity, problem-solving, and making abstract connections are the ways we separate ourselves from computers. This is perhaps even more pronounced in the information professions. Rote jobs in general are either getting taken over by machines, or moved offshore. We work in a post-industrial economy, but are clinging to early industrial educational standards, and unless we get out ahead of the wave, may be put in a position of defending or justifying why we our jobs are necessary. Perhaps a good practical takeaway from this is to start finding ways to automate those rote tasks to whatever extent is feasible, and focus on the aspects of the job that have sustainability, because it is going to happen anyway, and it might as well be on our terms.

Categories: Library News

Auto-Graphics, Inc expands California presence With VERSO ILS

Library Technology Reports - Sat, 2015-06-27 10:17
(June 27, 2015). Auto-Graphics and Rancho Mirage Public Library announce the selection and successful migration and go live of Auto-Graphics' VERSO, as the new Integrated Library System. After a competitive and thorough RFP process, Rancho Mirage Public Library, RMPL, selected Auto-Graphics as the vendor of choice with their latest iteration of ILS software.
Categories: Library News

Vijf Amsterdamse instellingen kiezen Pure als onderzoeksinformatiesysteem

Library Technology Reports - Sat, 2015-06-27 10:17
(June 27, 2015). De UvA, VU, VUmc, AMC en de HvA hebben gezamenlijk gekozen voor de aanschaf van het onderzoeksinformatiesysteen Pure van Elsevier B.V. Met deze voorlopige gunning gaat de aanbestedingsprocedure de volgende fase in.
Categories: Library News

NISO leadership edit new book on standards in information exchange

Library Technology Reports - Fri, 2015-06-26 22:14
(June 26, 2015). The Association of Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS) division of the American Library Association has published a new book edited by Todd A. Carpenter, the Executive Director of the National Information Standards Organization (NISO). The Critical Component: Standards in the Information Exchange Environment explores the process of developing information standards, the value of standards for libraries, publishing and the intermediaries that serve both communities. The book is published by ALCTS Publishing and is available in both print and electronic-book format. Carpenter, Nettie Lagace, NISO's Associate Director for Programs, and Cynthia Hodgson, recently retired NISO Editor, all contributed chapters to this publication.
Categories: Library News

The Free Ebook Foundation has launched

Library Technology Reports - Fri, 2015-06-26 22:14
(June 26, 2015). Two projects that have been building towards a sustainable ecosystem for free ebooks have joined together in a new non-profit corporation. The Free Ebook Foundation envisions a world where ebooks will be funded, distributed and maintained for the benefit of all, by coordinating the efforts and resources of many.
Categories: Library News

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