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Library and Information Technology Association
Updated: 9 min 26 sec ago

Making LibGuides Into Library Websites

Fri, 2015-03-27 08:00

Welcome to Part 2 of my two-part series introducing LibGuides CMS for use as a website. Read Part 1 (with comments from Springshare!). This companion piece was released February 27.

Why LibGuides?

LibGuides logo (© Springshare)

We can design surprisingly good websites with LibGuides 2.0 CMS. WordPress and Drupal are free and open source, but Springshare, the maker of LibGuides, also delivers reliable hosting and support for two grand a year. Moreover, even folks clueless about coding can quickly learn to maintain a LibGuides-based website because (1) the interface is drop-and-drag, fill-in-the-box intuitive, and (2) many academic librarians create research guides as part of their liaison duties and are already familiar with the system. Most importantly, libraries can customize LibGuides-based websites as extensively or minimally as available talent and time permits, without sacrificing visual appeal or usability–or control of the library’s own site.

LibGuides-Based Websites

There are some great LibGuides-based websites out there. Springshare has compiled exemplars across various library sectors here and here. Below are screenshots showing what you can do.

Albuquerque and Bernalillo County (ABC) Library homepage

The Albuquerque and Bernalillo County (ABC) Library is that rare public library that uses LibGuides. The homepage is beautifully laid out, with tons of neat customizations and a carousel that actually enhances UX, despite the load time. One of my favorite LibGuides sites!

World Maritime University Library homepage

The World Maritime University Library, run by the United Nations, has a beautifully minimalist blue-and-white look – classic Scandinavian. Like Google, the logo and search box are front and center; everything else is placed discreetly in tabs at the top and bottom of the homepage.

John S. Bailey Library, American College of Greece

The American College of Greece’s John S. Bailey Library is text-heavy, but its navigation is as clear as the Aegean Sea. Note the absence of a federated search box, which, unless the algorithms are of search-engine caliber, tends to produce results that undergraduates find bewildering.

Even you have other priorities or skills, you can still create a quality LibGuides-based website without major customizations to the stylesheets. Hillsborough Community College Library and Harrison College both do nice jobs, albeit with LibGuides 1.0. Walters State Community College did hardly any deep customizing of LibGuides 2.0, but its site is perfectly functional.

Walters State Community College Library homepage

My Library’s Website

Moving the Hodges University Library to LibGuides has followed a three-stage agile process.

1. September 2014. We upgraded the existing LibGuides CMS to LibGuides 2.0 and reorganized and enhanced existing content. Review my February 27 post for more on this first stage.

Hodges University Library’s faculty support page

2. January 2015. We rolled out the new library homepage and associated pages, which unified the library’s entire web presence under LibGuides. Previously our homepage was designed and run by the university’s IT department using Microsoft SharePoint (ugh), so students could only access the homepage by signing into the university intranet–dreadful for accessibility. We also shuffled DNS records and redirects so that the homepage has a much cleaner URL (library.hodges.edu) than previously (https://myhugo.hodges.edu/organizations/org-libr/Pages/Home.aspx). The new site can be accessed by anyone from anywhere without logging into anything. #librarianwin

3. June 2015. We will roll out the next major iteration of our website, integrating OCLC’s new and improved WorldCat discovery layer, our new LibAnswers virtual reference service, and our revamped website to build better UX. The page header and federated search box will be optimized for mobile devices, as the rest of the site already is. Our motto? Continual improvement!

Have you used LibGuides as a website? What is your experience?

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: March 25

Wed, 2015-03-25 12:42

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing. Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week

Business Librarian, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO

Library Discovery and Integrated System Coordinator, Princeton University Library, Princeton, NJ

Specialized Executive Librarian, BarnAllen Technologies, Inc., Alexandria, MDsarch

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a  job posting.

Categories: Library News

Creating Better Tutorials Through User-Centered Instructional Design

Wed, 2015-03-25 11:40
A LITA Preconference at 2015 ALA Annual

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference

Friday, June 26, 2015, 8:30am – 4:00pm

Have you wanted to involve users as you design interactive e-learning, but aren’t sure where to start? In this unique, hands-on workshop, you will learn the core and emerging principles of instructional and user experience design and apply what you have learned to design, develop, and test a tutorial you create. The three dynamic and experienced workshop facilitators will cover topics including design thinking, user-centered pedagogy, user interface prototyping, and intercept usability testing while providing hands-on practice in each area.

Check out these 3 tutorials examples:

Popular vs. Scholarly Sources
Academic Search Complete
Locating Manuscripts in Special Collections

Presenters:

Yvonne Mery, Instructional Design Librarian, University of Arizona

Yvonne co-authored the book, Online by Design: the Essentials of Creating Information Literacy Courses. She has co-authored several papers on the integration of information literacy in online classes and presented at numerous national conferences on best practices for online information literacy instruction.

Rebecca Blakiston, User Experience Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries

Rebecca has been at the University of Arizona Libraries since 2008, and the website product manager since 2010. She provides oversight, management, and strategic planning for the library website, specializing in guerilla usability testing, writing for the web, and content strategy. She developed a process for in-house usability testing, which has been implemented successfully both within website projects and in an ongoing, systematic way. She has authored, Usability Testing: a Practical Guide for Librarians.

Leslie Sult, Associate Librarian, University of Arizona

Leslie is in the Research and Learning department. Her work is focused on developing and improving scalable teaching models that enable the library to reach and support many more students than was possible earlier through traditional one-shot instructional sessions. With Gregory Hagedon, Leslie won the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award in 2013 for their work on the software Guide on the Side, which helps instruction librarians create tutorials for database instruction.

Guide on the Side

“Understanding that many librarians are feeling the pressure to find methods to support student learning that do not require direct, librarian-led instruction, the University of Arizona Library’s Guide on the Side provides an excellent tutorial grounded in sound pedagogy that could significantly change the way libraries teach students how to use databases,” said award committee co-chairs, Erin L. Ellis of the University of Kansas and Robin Kear of the University of Pittsburgh. “The creators have made a version of the software open access and freely available to librarians to quickly create online, interactive tutorials for database instruction. This allows librarians to easily create tutorials that are both engaging to students and pedagogically sound. Guide on the Side serves as a model of the future of library instruction.”

Registration:

Rates

  • LITA Member $235
  • ALA Member $350
  • Non-Member $380

How-to

To register for any of these events, you can include them with your initial conference registration or add them later using the unique link in your email confirmation. If you don’t have your registration confirmation handy, you can request a copy by emailing alaannual@compusystems.com. You also have the option of registering for a preconference only. To receive the LITA member pricing during the registration process on the Personal Information page enter the discount promotional code: LITA2015

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference
Call ALA Registration at 1-800-974-3084
Onsite registration will also be accepted in San Francisco.

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org

Categories: Library News

Further Thoughts On Tech Roles + Librarianship

Thu, 2015-03-19 09:00

Image courtesy of Flickr user deanj. CC BY.

Given the overwhelming response to Bryan’s post, “What is a Librarian?” and Michael’s follow up post, “Librarians: We Open Access,” a few more of the LITA bloggers thought we’d weigh in on our roles and how they fit within the profession. We hope you’ll share your story in the comments!

Lindsay C.

I remember when accepted my job, working at LYRASIS, feeling fearful that I wasn’t being a traditional librarian. Yes, I, Lindsay Cronk, unapologetic weirdo and loud lady, worried about traditional professional roles. I was concerned that my peers wouldn’t accept my work as librarianship. I got all kinds of high school lunch table self-conscious about it. I was being narrow-minded.

Most of us understand that the MLIS grad who works for a retail website providing taxonomy support and the MLIS grad who works in the academic library cataloging scholarly monographs are both librarians, and indeed peers (albeit with different job titles) who could probably give one another tips on running macros. Let’s get real. I have never worked in a library. I work for a library services organization. That said, all I ever do is troubleshoot access issues, provide outreach and education, promote services and use. My work is dedicated to advocacy for and of libraries. I’m a librarian’s librarian.

Grace T.

Currently in my first year of the MLS/MIS program, a ten hour drive away from my closest family and friends, and running from class to job to research to job, I’ve asked myself this same question. Where does this lead? Easy, librarianship. But what does that mean?

At both the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Indiana University, I’ve noticed the traditional, stuffy academic library transitioning. These libraries are moving stacks to auxiliary facilities, making room for “space.” Study space, makerspace, cafe space, meeting space. The library is, has always been, and will always be, a third space. It isn’t work and it isn’t home. It is the place you go to think, research, write, build, and further your knowledge.

Librarians are the keepers of this third space. They are there to support and guide the thinker/researcher/writer/builder. They are there to say, “Have you considered looking at this?” upon which a thesis is born. They build digital infrastructure so that patrons have even more to access and learn. They are fluid and adaptable, changing as the third space and its people continue to evolve.

Brittney F.

Before I began graduate studies in Library and Information Science a few years ago, I read a list on Forbes.com about the worst Master’s degrees for job placement. Surprisingly, Library and Information Science was ranked as the worst. At the time I couldn’t believe it. Because I had done my research into the degree program, I knew it was interdisciplinary. The image on Forbes.com is of a woman helping children. The mid-career average is $58k a year with an 8.5% turnover average by 2020. I thought that this interpretation of the degree and librarianship was inaccurate. It was an attempt to associate the name of the degree with a specific job description and to quantify the worth of our contribution to the field.

The MLIS degree prepares both practitioners and scholars for a range of information-provision environments. In 2011, then a Syracuse University iSchool graduate student, Mia Breitkopf wrote an article called 61 Non-Librarian Jobs for LIS Grads. It is a non-exhaustive list of job titles that do not fit into the traditional image of the librarian profession. Some of the titles include research coordinator, web analytics manager and business information specialist. Whoever compiled that list for Forbes.com did not take into account the breadth of skills an MLIS student is exposed to in the graduate environment. They certainly didn’t recognize the necessity for information scientists in all organization types. Name any work environment and I will point out an information manager. We wear many hats.

I find solace in the fact that I love technology and history, I could parlay those interests into the archives field working with digital medium, and that Forbes.com has been somewhat enlightened. The Masters of Library and Information Science is now the third worst master’s degree according to their 2014 list.

Brianna M.

I am a recent graduate with a Master of Library Science and a Master of Information Science. I remember hearing from people who graduated before me that they felt odd about applying for non-librarian jobs in the first place, then a little bittersweet if they got them. They had an emotional tie to the idea of librarianship. Of course, you haven’t won if you get a librarian job; you haven’t sold out if you take a non-traditional role. It’s unlikely that anyone would ever vocalize anything like this but I do think that a lot of people come to library school with very specific, idealized visions of what they will do when they leave.

Hearing these things made me realize that I needed to think long and hard about what I wanted. I recognized that it was time for me to battle my own assumptions. I wanted to actively choose libraries, not flock to them as a knee-jerk reaction simply because I had made the decision to go to library school when I was 18. I’ve found that adopting this state of reevaluation actually keeps me more engaged within the field. I am more critical, less patient – and honestly, I think libraries need a lot more of both qualities.

So where did I end up? Technically, I am not a librarian, I’m a coordinator – an IT role within a library where I do librarian-ish things. I’m not sure where my career will take me and I’m unconcerned about what my future job titles may be. The more interesting question, unpacked much more eloquently than I could by the Library Loon, is how institutions can support these messy new roles. I would love to hear more discussion between administrators and those of us with these odd, hard to classify roles about how we can increase our chances of success in uncharted territory.

Michael R.

Following up on my February 27 post, “Librarians: We Open Access,” I’d like to reprint below, in edited and expanded form, some of my responses to comments on the original post.

First, opening access is not gatekeeping. I’d rather dismantle the gate than be its keeper. Rather, the goal is grow the people’s information commons–note that I use the term “grow” rather than “build,” a premeditated word choice whose reasoning reflects Debbie Chachra’s Atlantic article “Why I Am Not a Maker.” Opening access might, for example, entail liberating libraries and users from our current dependence on price-gouging, privacy-breaching vendors and publishers.

Knowledge creation, one of the new buzzwords of librarianship, nicely complements open access. Knowledge creation presumably requires access to existing knowledge, and targeting that access to our local and global communities and their needs is essential. Once knowledge is created, librarians ought to be providing gratis access to that new knowledge and guidance on its uses, which will hopefully engender more knowledge making, a more open society, and a growing information commons that acknowledges the “think globally, act locally” approach. This is a cycle, and access is the first spoke of the wheel, though by no means the wheel itself.

In her comment on my original post, Brianna mentioned big tent librarianship. I like it. Inclusivity doesn’t diffuse our energies. We need unabashed militancy in pursuit of core values to which information specialists can rally. Intellectual freedom has long been one of these core ideologies. To continue my post’s running metaphors of imprisoning walls and growth versus construction, surely opening access can become one of those metaphorical fetters hammered into plowshares.

Do you consider yourself a librarian? A technologist? Both? Tell us about your role in the comments!

Categories: Library News

LITA Updates, March 2015

Wed, 2015-03-18 16:10

This is one of our periodic messages sent to all LITA members. This update provides

  • Election details
  • An urgent call to action from the Washington Office
  • Current Online Learning Opportunities

Election details

ALA Candidates who are LITA members include:

  • Presidential candidate:
    • Joseph Janes
  • Council candidates:
    • Brett Bonfield
    • Megan Drake
    • Henry Mensch
    • Colby Mariva Riggs
    • Jules Shore
    • Eric Suess
    • Joan Weeks

LITA Division Candidates include

  • President Candidates:
    • Aimee Fifarek
    • Nancy Colyar
  • Director-at-large candidates:
    • Ken Varnum
    • Susan Sharpless Smith
    • Martin Kalfatovic
    • Frank Cervone

“Voting will begin at 9 a.m. Central time on March 24. Between March 24 and March 26, ALA will notify voters by email, providing them with their unique passcodes and information about how to vote online. To ensure receipt of their ballot, members should watch for emails from ALA Election Coordinator, noreply@directvote.net. The subject line will be “ALA 2015 election login information below.” The polls will close on Friday, May 1, at 11:59 p.m. Central time.

For the seventh year in a row, ALA is holding its election exclusively online. To be eligible to vote, individuals must be members in good standing as of January 31, 2015. Although the election is being conducted online, there remains one exception: Members with disabilities and without internet access may obtain a paper ballot by contacting ALA customer service at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5. Those without internet access at home or work can easily access the election site by visiting their local public (or in many instances academic or school) library.

Voters will receive email reminders on April 7 and April 14. Voting may be completed in one sitting, or an individual may park their ballot and return at a later date; however, a ballot is not cast until the “submit” button is clicked. Anyone with a parked ballot will receive an email reminder to complete the voting process before May 1.”

Please take 60 seconds to help libraries by March 20, 2015
Emily Sheketoff, director, ALA Washington Office

“Millions in federal funding for libraries is currently hanging in the balance. In order to save library funding from the chopping block – particularly the Library Services Technology Act (LSTA) and Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) programs —library supporters need to contact offices of their Representative and Senator and ask them to show support for continued library funding by signing “Dear Appropriator” letters about LSTA & IAL that three Members of Congress who are huge library champions have drafted to the Appropriations Committees in the House and Senate. The more Members of Congress that we can get to sign these “Dear Appropriator” letters, the better the chance of preserving and securing real money for libraries so that libraries can continue to do all the great work they do in their communities. The only way we can achieve this is through grassroots efforts. Members of Congress need to hear from as many voters as we can rally to action.

Please email or phone your members of Congress and ask them to sign the Dear Appropriator letter supporting LSTA and IAL, then ask all other library supporters you know to do the same by no later than March 20th.

Contact info is here:

http://cqrcengage.com/ala/home (just put in your zip code in the box on the lower right side).

You are welcome to forward this email to local, state or regional library listservs.

To see whether your Members of Congress signed the letters last year, view the FY 2015 Funding Letter Signees document (pdf). If so, please be sure to thank and remind them of that when you email or call! More information can be found on District Dispatch and here’s some helpful background information:

BACKGROUND INFORMATION for “DEAR APPROPRIATOR” LETTERS

LSTA

LSTA is the only source of funding for libraries in the federal budget. The bulk of this funding is returned to states through a population-based grant program through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Libraries use LSTA funds to, among other things, build and maintain 21st century collections that facilitate employment and entrepreneurship, community engagement, and individual empowerment. For more information on LSTA, check out this document LSTA Background and Ask (pdf)

HOUSE STAFF/ CHAMPION Norma Salazar (Representative Raul Grijalva)

SENATE STAFF/ CHAMPION Elyse Wasch (Senator Jack Reed)

IAL

IAL is the only federal program supporting literacy for underserved school libraries and has become the primary source for federal funding for school library materials. Focusing on low income schools, these funds help many schools bring their school libraries up to standard. For more information on IAL, view School Libraries Brief (pdf).

HOUSE STAFF/ CHAMPION Don Andres (Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson)

SENATE STAFF/ CHAMPION James Rice (Senator Charles Grassle)

Current Online Learning Opportunities

Beyond Web Page Analytics: Using Google tools to assess user behavior across web properties
Presenters: Ed Sanchez, Rob Nunez and Keven Riggle
Offered: March 31, 2015
Currently sold out. To be placed on the wait list send an email to registration@ala.org

Taking the Struggle Out of Statistics web course
Presenter: Jackie Bronicki
Offered: April 6 – May 3, 2015
Currently sold out. To be placed on the wait list send an email to registration@ala.org

Yes, You Can Video: A how-to guide for creating high-impact instructional videos without tearing your hair out
Presenters: Anne Burke and Andreas Orphanides
Offered: May 12, 2015
Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)

I encourage you to connect with LITA by:

  1. Exploring our web site.
  2. Subscribing to LITA-L email discussion list.
  3. Visiting the LITA blog and LITA Division page on ALA Connect.
  4. Connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter.
  5. Reaching out to the LITA leadership at any time.

Please note: the Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) journal is available to you and to the entire profession. ITAL features high-quality articles that undergo rigorous peer-review as well as case studies, commentary, and information about topics and trends of interest to the LITA community and beyond. Be sure to sign up for notifications when new issues are posted (March, June, September, and December).

If you have any questions or wish to discuss any of these items, please do let me know.

All the best,

Mary

Mary Taylor, Executive Director
Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)
50 E. Huron, Chicago, IL 60611
800-545-2433 x4267
312-280-4267 (direct line)
312-280-3257 (fax)
mtaylor (at) ala.org
www.lita.org

Join us in Minneapolis, November 12-15, 2015 for the LITA Forum.

Categories: Library News

Plan Before You Code a Website

Wed, 2015-03-18 09:00

Plan I report Licensed under a Creative Commons License from www.nesta.org.uk

When working on a new website it is so easy to want to jump right in and start coding, or at least start storyboarding. I have been working on a new website with the marketing department at my university, and before we could start any work they asked me to first define my audience.

Once I clearly articulated who I was trying to reach I was asked to provide information for specific pages. As a team we decided to include the following pages:

  • Landing Page
  • Supplemental Pages
    • About
    • Resources
    • Events
    • Contact us
    • Event Slider
    • Calendar

Then, I was asked to identify the sub-groups of my broadly defined audience that each page should target. We only started writing once each page had a specified population. The words used for each page needed to align with both the broad audience and the targeted sub-group.

The process of planning a website before creating the website has been a great learning experience. I have been forced to articulate my goals and specify end users. I’ve been more thoughtful about this project than I have been in previous instances when many decisions were left up to me. Our marketing team has been an amazing resource and I hope to apply their thinking to future projects.

Does anyone else ever feel like they need a public relations training to be a librarian?

Also, I’d love to hear any advice you have for me as I plan websites.

Categories: Library News

LITA President’s Program with Lou Rosenfeld

Tue, 2015-03-17 12:51

The Library User Experience Crossroads:
a dialogue with Lou Rosenfeld

Join us in San Francisco during the ALA Annual Conference at the LITA Awards Presentation & LITA President’s Program, when LITA President Rachel Vacek welcomes Lou Rosenfeld to present on the latest cutting edge issues of concern to technology librarians.

Sunday, June 28, 2015, 3:00 – 4:00pm
Location to be announced on the ALA Schedule soon

You’ve heard a lot about—and maybe even tried to do something—about user experience. And naturally, you have questions. Do librarians have an edge when it comes to UX, or are we behind UX’s other feeder disciplines? Why is UX research so important for libraries? Can libraries even afford to provide good experiences these days? Lou Rosenfeld sits squarely at the intersection of UX and librarianship (and hopes not to get run over). He is a former librarian who many consider one of the “fathers of information architecture” and who now publishes books on user experience. He’ll tackle your questions with moderation from LITA President Rachel Vacek—and may even answer some.

Lou Rosenfeld has been instrumental in helping establish the fields of information architecture and user experience, and in articulating the role and value of librarianship within those fields. Lou is co-author of Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (O’Reilly; 4th edition to be published in 2015) and Search Analytics for Your Site (Rosenfeld Media, 2011), co-founder of the Information Architecture Institute and the Information Architecture Summit and Enterprise UX conferences, and a former columnist for Internet World, CIO, and Web Review magazines.

Lou founded the ground-breaking information architecture consultancy Argus Associates in the early 1990s. As an independent consultant, he has helped a variety of large and highly-political enterprises make their information more findable, including Caterpillar, PayPal, Ford, AT&T, the Centers for Disease Control, Accenture, and the NCAA. Lou now manages Rosenfeld Media, which publishes some of the best-loved books in user experience, produces UX events, and equips UX teams with coaching and training.

Follow Lou @louisrosenfeld

Categories: Library News

2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award goes to David Walker

Mon, 2015-03-16 17:04

David Walker has been named the winner of the 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Outstanding Communication in Library and Information Technology.

Emerald Group Publishing, and, the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) sponsor the award that recognizes outstanding individuals or institutions for their long-term contributions in the area of Library and Information Science technology and its application.

Walker is being recognized for his dedication and commitment in developing open source library portal application Xerxes over the past decade. Originally designed as an improved interface to the Ex Libris Metalib federated search system in 2004, Xerxes now supports a variety of back-end search engines, including commercial library discovery systems, such as Primo, EDS, Summon, non-cost web service (EBSCO Integration Toolkit, Worldcat API), and other search engines (Solr, Google Appliance). Through this effort, Walker has worked with a variety of vendors to develop and test their application programming interfaces, and has been recognized by OCLC and Ex Libris for innovative uses of their services. In 2007 Walker released the system under an open source license, and today, Xerxes platform is implemented by over 40 institutions around the globe, with some also contributing code back to the project.

Walker says, “These days, academic libraries are increasingly opting for hosted discovery systems and library services platforms. It’s still vitally important that libraries retain responsibility for the interfaces we present users, and explore new and creative ways to integrate library content and services into learning management systems and other online spaces, which cannot be easily achieved by vendor discovery systems or services platforms. Xerxes continues to provide a flexible and open source platform to explore such projects, regardless of the underlying discovery system or library services platform.”

Currently, Walker serves as Director of Systemwide Digital Library Services at the California State University (CSU), Office of the Chancellor. In this capacity, he oversees a systemwide discovery system, link resolver, and institutional repository service for all 23 CSU campuses. His recent work has focused on moving the CSU libraries from a disparate and disconnected set of local ILS and ERM systems toward a consortium library services platform, as well as exploring integration of library systems and services with learning management systems.

Walker received his MLIS from UCLA. As a librarian, programmer, and interface designer, he has led and contributed to a number of open source initiatives in the library community, including developing scripts, plugins, and interface designs for the SFX link resolver, Innovative ILS systems, and other library services.

The Library and Information Technology Association and Emerald, the publisher of Library Hi Tech, are pleased to present the 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award to David Walker for his outstanding contributions to communication in library science and technology. The award will be presented during Sunday Afternoon with LITA on June 28, 2015, at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco.

About LITA

Established in 1966, LITA is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership including systems librarians, library administrators, library technologists, library schools, vendors and many others interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers. For more information about LITA go to www.lita.org, or contact the LITA office by phone, 800-545-2433, ext. 4268; or e-mail: lita@ala.org

About Emerald

Emerald is a global publisher linking research and practice to the benefit of society. The company manages a portfolio of more than 290 journals and over 2,500 books and book series volumes. It also provides an extensive range of value-added products, resources and services to support its customers’ needs. Emerald is COUNTER 4 compliant. Emerald is also a partner of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and works with Portico and the LOCKSS initiative for digital archive preservation. It also works in close collaboration with a number of organizations and associations worldwide.

Question and Comments

Mary Taylor
Executive Director
Library & Information Technology Association (LITA)
(800) 545-2433 ext 4267
mtaylor@ala.org

Categories: Library News

Yes, You Can Video!

Wed, 2015-03-11 15:24

A how-to guide for creating high-impact instructional videos without tearing your hair out.

Tuesday May 12, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

This brand new LITA Webinar promises a fun time learning how to create instructional videos

Have you ever wanted to create an engaging and educational instructional video, but felt like you didn’t have the time, ability, or technology? Are you perplexed by all the moving parts that go into creating an effective tutorial? In this session, Anne Burke and Andreas Orphanides will help to demystify the process, breaking it down into easy-to-follow steps, and provide a variety of technical approaches suited to a range of skill sets. They will cover choosing and scoping your topic, scripting and storyboarding, producing the video, and getting it online. They will also address common pitfalls at each stage.

Join

Anne Burke
Undergraduate Instruction & Outreach Librarian
North Carolina State University Libraries

and

Andreas Orphanides
Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning
North Carolina State University Libraries

Then register for the webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.
Cost:

LITA Member: $45
Non-Member: $105
Group: $196
Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org.

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: March 11

Wed, 2015-03-11 13:20

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing. Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week

Director, Library Information Technology Services,  Kansas State University Libraries,  Manhattan, KS

Manager, University Library Systems, Kent State University ,  Kent State University Libraries, Kent, OH

Network Engineer – Library, City of Phoenix,  Phoenix, AZ

Reference and Instruction Librarian,  Pennsylvania State University Libraries, Erie Campus,  Erie, PA

Web Services Librarian, University of Oregon Libraries,  Eugene, OR

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a  job posting.

 

Categories: Library News

Is Your Library In?

Wed, 2015-03-11 09:00

In my previous post, I discussed learning XSLT for my current Indiana University Digital Library Program internship. Along the way, I explained a little about TEI/XML, as well. Thinking about these tools led me to consider all of the different markup and programming languages, and tools that go into building a digital library. While my Guide to Digital Library Tools is kept for another day, I wanted to explore one platform in particular. Omeka.

IU hosts a fantastic series called Digital Library Brown Bags on Wednesdays throughout the school year. I’ve attended many and see an Omeka usage pattern emerging. The most recent Brown Bag was titled Designing the Digital Scholarly Commons: “In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen: Jewish Life in Interwar Lodz” given by Halina Goldberg, Associate Professor of Music at the Jacobs School of Music, and Adam Hochstetter, Web Developer for the Jacobs School of Music.

After seeing many projects utilizing Omeka and creating a few of my own, I was astounded by the extensiveness and detail of this particular project including panorama photograph tours and pop-up information (sign up for notification when the exhibit goes live here). Omeka’s uses are twofold: digital storage for digitized items and a platform to exhibit those items. There are two versions, Omeka.net, though which users can host projects for free or a small fee, and Omeka.org, hearty, more expensive and hosted by an individual person or organization.

To store items, Omeka utilizes the Dublin Core Metadata initiative metadata scheme. Once a user uploads an item (read: picture of an item) he or she fills out a form asking about different parts of the metadata, such as creator, date, description, publisher, language, etc. The item list is always available to browse.

The real magic happens though an exhibit. Like physical exhibits in a rare book library, museum or gallery, the Omeka exhibitor brings together items in relation to a theme. In the example above, the theme was the items found in “Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen” and their cultural and historical significance. Omeka provides nearly seamless integration of items in exhibits, hence the magic. Programmers can also do back-end code and template alterations, similar to WordPress.

When beginning to use Omeka, there is a small learning curve and a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) feel. I’m curious if this is the reason many libraries choose to implement Omeka projects. Throughout the Brown Bag series and presentations featuring Omeka, I’ve noticed that ¾ of the time is spent discussing the project, and the rest is spent discussing problems or limitations with Omeka. There is always a question along the lines of “so, once you store all of this information in Omeka, can you integrate it with other platforms? Can you export it out?”

As digital librarians find ways to link and standardize digital projects across the web, what will this mean for data “trapped” within Omeka? When I think about this question something like this pops into my mind:

Image retrieved from kids.baristanet.com.

But with Omeka so widely used and only increasing in popularity for library and digital humanities projects, is the orange person an Omeka project with linked projects in blue, or the opposite?

I would love to hear if your library is “in” with Omeka or “in” with other digital exhibits and libraries! Feel free to comment with your successes, limitations, questions, and remarks!

Categories: Library News

2015 Kilgour Award Goes to Ed Summers

Mon, 2015-03-09 17:27

The Library & Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), announces Ed Summers as the 2015 winner of the Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology. The award, which is jointly sponsored by OCLC, is given for research relevant to the development of information technologies, especially work which shows promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect(s) of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information, or the processes by which information and data is manipulated and managed. The awardee receives $2,000, a citation, and travel expenses to attend the award ceremony at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco, where the award will be presented on June 28, 2015.

Ed Summers is Lead Developer at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), University of Maryland. Ed has been working for two decades helping to build connections between libraries and archives and the larger communities of the World Wide Web. During that time Ed has worked in academia, start-ups, corporations and the government. He is interested in the role of open source software, community development, and open access to enable digital curation. Ed has a MS in Library and Information Science and a BA in English and American Literature from Rutgers University.

Prior to joining MITH Ed helped build the Repository Development Center (RDC) at the Library of Congress. In that role he led the design and implementation of the NEH funded National Digital Newspaper Program’s Web application, which provides access to 8 million newspapers from across the United States. He also helped create the Twitter archiving application that has archived close to 500 billion tweets (as of September 2014). Ed created LC’s image quality assurance service that has allowed curators to sample and review over 50 million images. He served as a member of the Semantic Web Deployment Group at the W3C where he helped standardize SKOS, which he put to use in implementing the initial version of LC’s Linked Data service.

Before joining the Library of Congress Ed was a software developer at Follett Corporation where he designed and implemented knowledge management applications to support their early e-book efforts. He was the fourth employee at CheetahMail in New York City, where he led the design of their data management applications. And prior to that Ed worked in academic libraries at Old Dominion University, the University of Illinois and Columbia University where he was mostly focused on metadata management applications.

Ed likes to use experiments to learn about the Web and digital curation. Examples of this include his work with Wikipedia on Wikistream, which helps visualize the rate of change on Wikipedia, and CongressEdits, which allows Twitter users to follow edits being made to Wikipedia from the Congress. Some of these experiments are social, such as his role in creating the code4lib community, which is an international, cross-disciplinary group of hackers, designers and thinkers in the digital library space.

Notified of the award, Ed said: “It is a great honor to have been selected to receive the Kilgour Award this year. I was extremely surprised since I have spent most of my professional career (so far) as a developer, building communities of practice around software for libraries and archives, rather than traditional digital library research. During this time I have had the good fortune to work with some incredibly inspiring and talented individuals, teams and open source collaborators. I’ve only been as good as these partnerships have allowed me to be, and I’m looking forward to more. I am especially grateful to all those individuals that worked on a free and open Internet and World Wide Web. I remain convinced that this is a great time for library and archives professionals, as the information space of the Web is in need of our care, attention and perspective.”

Members of the 2014-15 Frederick G. Kilgour Award committee are:

  • Tao Zhang, Purdue University (chair)
  • Erik Mitchell, University of California, Berkeley (past chair)
  • Danielle Cunniff Plumer, DCPlumer Associates, LLC
  • Holly Tomren, Drexel University Libraries
  • Jason Simon, Fitchburg State University
  • Kebede Wordofa, Austin Peay State University, and
  • Roy Tennant, OCLC liaison

About LITA

Established in 1966, LITA is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership of over 3,000 systems librarians, library technologists, library administrators, library schools, vendors and many others interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers. For more information, visit www.lita.org.

About OCLC

Founded in 1967, OCLC is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world’s information and reducing library costs. OCLC Research is one of the world’s leading centers devoted exclusively to the challenges facing libraries in a rapidly changing information environment. It works with the community to collaboratively identify problems and opportunities, prototype and test solutions, and share findings through publications, presentations and professional interactions. For more information, visit www.oclc.org/research.

Question and Comments

Mary Taylor
Executive Director
Library & Information Technology Association (LITA)
(800) 545-2433 ext 4267
mtaylor@ala.org

 

Categories: Library News

Librarians, Take the Struggle Out of Statistics

Fri, 2015-03-06 13:50

Check out the brand new LITA web course:
Taking the Struggle Out of Statistics 

Instructor: Jackie Bronicki, Collections and Online Resources Coordinator, University of Houston.

Offered: April 6 – May 3, 2015
A Moodle based web course with asynchronous weekly lectures, tutorials, assignments, and group discussion.

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Recently, librarians of all types have been asked to take a more evidence-based look at their practices. Statistics is a powerful tool that can be used to uncover trends in library-related areas such as collections, user studies, usability testing, and patron satisfaction studies. Knowledge of basic statistical principles will greatly help librarians achieve these new expectations.

This course will be a blend of learning basic statistical concepts and techniques along with practical application of common statistical analyses to library data. The course will include online learning modules for basic statistical concepts, examples from completed and ongoing library research projects, and also exercises accompanied by practice datasets to apply techniques learned during the course.

Got assessment in your title or duties? This brand new web course is for you!

Here’s the Course Page

Jackie Bronicki’s background is in research methodology, data collection and project management for large research projects including international dialysis research and large-scale digitization quality assessment. Her focus is on collection assessment and evaluation and she works closely with subject liaisons, web services, and access services librarians at the University of Houston to facilitate various research projects.

Date:
April 6, 2015 – May 3, 2015

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

Technical Requirements

Moodle login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date. The Moodle-developed course site will include weekly asynchronous lectures and is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructor. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. The course web site will be open for 1 week prior to the start date for students to have access to Moodle instructions and set their browser correctly. The course site will remain open for 90 days after the end date for students to refer back to course material.

Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org.

Categories: Library News

In Praise of Anaconda

Fri, 2015-03-06 04:00

Do you want to learn to code?  Of course you do, why wouldn’t you?  Programming is fun, like solving a puzzle.  It helps you think in a computational and pragmatic way about certain problems, allowing you to automate those problems away with a few lines of code.  Choosing to learn programming is the first step on your path, and the second is choosing a language.  These days there are many great languages to choose from, each with their own strengths and weaknesses.  The right language for you depends heavily on what you want to do (as well as what language your coworkers are using).

If you don’t have any coder colleagues and can’t decide on a language, I would suggest taking a look at Python.  It’s mature, battle-tested, and useful for a just about anything.  I work across many different domains (often in the same day) and Python is a powerful tool that helps me take care of business whether I’m processing XML, analyzing data or batch renaming and moving files between systems.  Python was created to be easy to read and aims to have one obvious “right” way to do any given task.  These language design decisions not only make Python an easy language to learn, but an easy language to remember as well.

One of the potential problems with Python is that it might not already be on your computer.  Even if it is on your computer, it’s most likely an older version (the difference between Python v2 and v3 is kind of a big deal). This isn’t necessarily a problem with Python though; you would probably have to install a new interpreter (the program that reads and executes your code) no matter what language you choose. The good news is that there is a very simple (and free!) tool for getting the latest version of Python on your computer regardless of whether you are using Windows, Mac or Linux.  It’s called Anaconda.

Anaconda is a Python distribution, which means that it is Python, just packaged in a special way. This special packaging turns out to make all the difference.  Installing an interpreter is usually not a trivial task; it often requires an administrator password to install (which you probably won’t have on any system other than your personal computer) and it could cause conflicts if an earlier version already exists on the system.  Luckily Anaconda bypasses most of this pain with a unique installer that puts a shiny new Python in your user account (this means you can install it on any system you can log in to, though others on the system wouldn’t be able to use it), completely separate from any pre-existing version of Python.  Learning to take advantage of this installer was a game-changer for me since I can now write and run Python code on any system where I have a user account.  Anaconda allows Python to be my programming Swiss Army knife; versatile, handy and always available.

Another important thing to understand about Anaconda’s packaging is that it comes with a lot of goodies.  Python is famous for having an incredible amount of high-quality tools built in to the language, but Anaconda extends this even further. It comes with Spyder, a graphical text editor that makes writing Python code easier, as well as many packages that extend the langauge’s capabilities. Python’s convenience and raw number crunching power has made it a popular language in the scientific programming community, and a large number of powerful data processing and analysis libraries have been developed by these scientists as a result. You don’t have to be a scientist to take advantage of these libraries, though; the simplicity of Python makes these libraries accessible to anyone with the courage to dive in and try them out.  Anaconda includes the best of these scientific libraries: IPython, NumPy, SciPy, pandas, matplotlib, NLTK, scikit-learn, and many others (I use IPython and pandas pretty frequently, and I’m in the process of learning matplotlib and NLTK).  Some of these libraries are a bit tricky to install and configure with the standard Python interpreter, but Anaconda is set up and ready to use them from the start.  All you have to do is use them.

While we’re on the subject of tricky installations, there are many more packages that Anaconda doesn’t  come with that can be a pain to install as well. Luckily Anaconda comes with its own package manager, conda, which is handy for not only grabbing new packages and installing them effortlessly, but also for upgrading the packages you have to the latest version. Conda even works on the Python interpreter itself, so when a new version of Python comes out you don’t have to reinstall anything.  Just to test it out, I upgraded to the latest version of Python, 3.4.2, while writing this article. I typed in ‘conda update python‘ and had the newest version running in less than 30 seconds.

In summary, Anaconda makes Python even more simple, convenient and powerful.  If you are looking for an easy way to take Python for a test drive, look no further than Anaconda to get Python on your system as fast as possible. Even seasoned Python pros can appreciate the reduced complexity Anaconda offers for installing and maintaining some of Python’s more advanced packages, or putting a Python on systems where you need it but lack security privileges. As an avid Python user who could install Python and all its packages from scratch, I choose to use Anaconda because it streamlines the process to an incredible degree.  If you would like to try it out, just download Anaconda and follow the guide.

Categories: Library News

February Library Tech Roundup

Thu, 2015-03-05 11:15

Image courtesy of Flickr user paloetic (CC-BY)

We’re debuting a new series this month: a roundup inspired by our friends at Hack Library School! Each month, the LITA bloggers will share selected library tech links, resources, and ideas that resonated with us. Enjoy – and don’t hesitate to tell us what piqued your interest recently in the comments section!

Brianna M.

Get excited: This month I discovered some excellent writing related to research data management.

Bryan B.

The lion’s share of my work revolves around our digital library system, and lately I’ve been waxing philosophical about what role these systems play in our culture. I don’t have a concrete answer yet, but I’m getting there.

John K.

I’m just unburying myself from a major public computer revamp (new PCs, new printers, new reservation/printing system, mobile printing, etc.) so here are a few things I’ve found interesting:

Lauren H.

This month my life is starting to revolve around online learning.  Here’s what I’ve been reading:

Leanne O.

I’ve been immersed in metadata and cataloguing, so here’s a grab bag of what’s intrigued me lately:

Lindsay C.

Hey, LITA Blog readers. Are you managing multiple projects? Have you run out of Post-it (R) notes? Are the to-do lists not cutting it anymore? Me too. The struggle is real. Here are a set of totally unrelated links to distract all of us from the very pressing tasks at hand. I mean inspire us to finish the work.

Categories: Library News

LITA Webinar: Beyond Web Page Analytics

Wed, 2015-03-04 12:38

Or how to use Google tools to assess user behavior across web properties.

Tuesday March 31, 2015
11:00 am – 12:30 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

This brand new LITA Webinar shows how Marquette University Libraries have installed custom tracking code and meta tags on most of their web interfaces including:

  • CONTENTdm
  • Digital Commons
  • Ebsco EDS
  • ILLiad
  • LibCal
  • LibGuides
  • WebPac, and the
  • General Library Website

The data retrieved from these interfaces is gathered into Google’s

  • Universal Analytics
  • Tag Manager, and
  • Webmaster Tools

When used in combination these tools create an in-depth view of user behavior across all these web properties.

For example Google Tag Manager can grab search terms which can be related to a specific collection within Universal Analytics and related to a particular demographic. The current versions of these tools make systems setup an easy process with little or no programming experience required. Making sense of the volume of data retrieved, however, is more difficult.

  • How does Google data compare to vendor stats?
  • How can the data be normalized using Tag Manager?
  • Can this data help your organization make better decisions?

Join

  • Ed Sanchez, Head, Library Information Technology, Marquette University Libraries
  • Rob Nunez, Emerging Technologies Librarian, Marquette University Libraries and
  • Keven Riggle, Systems Librarian & Webmaster, Marquette University Libraries

In this webinar as they explain their new processes and explore these questions. Check out their program outline: http://libguides.marquette.edu/ga-training/outline

Then register for the webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.
Cost:

  • LITA Member: $39
  • Non-Member: $99
  • Group: $190

Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email registration@ala.org

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org.

Categories: Library News

Agile Development: Estimation and Scheduling

Wed, 2015-03-04 09:00

Image courtesy of Wikipedia

In my last post, I discussed the creation of Agile user stories. This time I’m going to talk about what to do with them once you have them. There are two big steps that need to be completed in order to move from user story creation to development: effort estimation and prioritization. Each poses its own problems.

Estimating Effort

Because Agile development relies on flexibility and adaptation, creating a bottom-up effort estimation analysis is both difficult and impractical. You don’t want to spend valuable time analyzing a piece of functionality up front only to have the implementation details change because of something that happens earlier in the development process, be it a change in another story, customer feedback, etc. Instead, it’s better to rely on your development team’s expertise and come up with top-down estimates that are accurate enough to get the development process started. This may at times make you feel uncomfortable, as if you’re looking for groundwater with a stick (it’s called dowsing, by the way), but in reality it’s about doing the minimum work necessary to come up with a reasonably accurate projection.

Estimation methods vary, but the key is to discuss story size in relative terms rather than assigning a number of hours of development time. Some teams find a story that is easy to estimate and calibrate all other stories relative to it, using some sort of relative “story points” scale (powers of 2, the Fibonacci sequence, etc.). Others create a relative scale and tag each story with a value from it: this can be anything from vehicles (this story is a car, this one is an aircraft carrier, etc.), to t-shirt sizes, to anything that is intuitive to the team. Another method is planning poker: the team picks a set of sizing values, and each member of the team assigns one of those values to each story by holding up a card with the value on it; if there’s significant variation, the team discusses the estimates and comes up with a compromise.  What matters is not the method, but that the entire team participate in the estimation discussion for each story.

Learn more about Agile estimation here and here.

Prioritizing User Stories

The other piece of information we need in order to begin scheduling is the importance of each story, and for that we must turn to the business side of the organization. Prioritization in Agile is an ongoing process (as opposed to a one-time ranking) that allows the team to understand which user stories carry the biggest payoff at any point in the process. Once they are created, all user stories go into a the product backlog, and each time the team plans a new sprint it picks stories off the top of the list until their capacity is exhausted, so it is very important that the Product Owner maintain a properly ordered backlog.

As with estimation, methods vary, but the key is to follow a process that evaluates each story on the value it adds to the product at any point. If I just rank the stories numerically, that does not provide any clarity as to why that is, which will be confusing to the team (and to me as well as the backlog grows). Most teams adopt a ranking system that scores each story individually; here’s a good example. This method uses two separate criteria: urgency and business value. Business value measures the positive impact of a given story on users. Urgency provides information about how important it is to complete a story earlier rather than later in the development process, taking into account dependencies between user stories, contractual obligations, complexity, etc. Basically, Business Value represents the importance of including a story in the finished product, and Urgency tells us how much it matters when that story is developed (understanding that a story’s likelihood of being completed decreases the later in the process it is slotted). Once the stories have been evaluated along the two axes (a simple 1-5 scale can be used for each) an overall priority number is obtained by multiplying the two values, which gives us the final priority score. The backlog is then ordered using this value.

As the example in the link shows, a Product Owner can also create priority bands that describe stories at a high level: must-have, nice to have, won’t develop, etc. This provides context for the priority score and gives the team information about the PO’s expectations for each story.

I’ll be back next month to talk about building an Agile culture. In the meantime, what methods does your team use to estimate and prioritize user stories?

Categories: Library News

Join LITA’s Imagineering IG at ALA Annual

Tue, 2015-03-03 08:00

Editor’s note: This is guest post by Breanne Kirsch.

During the upcoming 2015 ALA Annual Conference, LITA’s Imagineering Interest Group will host the program “Unknown Knowns and Known Unknowns: How Speculative Fiction Gets Technological Innovation Right and Wrong.” A panel of science fiction and fantasy authors will discuss their work and how it connects with technological developments that were never invented and those that came about in unimagined ways. Tor is sponsoring the program and bringing authors John Scalzi, Vernor Vinge, Greg Bear, and Marie Brennan. Baen Books is also sponsoring the program by bringing Larry Correia to the author panel.

John Scalzi wrote the Old Man’s War series and more recently, Redshirts, which won the 2013 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Vernor Vinge is known for his Realtime/Bobble and Zones of Thought Series and a number of short fiction stories. Greg Bear has written a number of series, including Darwin, The Forge of God, Songs of Earth and Power, Quantum Logic, and The Way. He has also written books for the Halo series, short fiction, and standalone books, most recently, War Dogs as well as the upcoming novels Eternity and Eon. Marie Brennan has written the Onyx Court series, a number of short stories, and more recently the Lady Trent series, including the upcoming Voyage of the Basilisk. Larry Correia has written the Monster Hunter series, Grimnoir Chronicles, Dead Six series, and Iron Kingdoms series. These authors will consider the role speculative fiction plays in fostering innovation and bringing about new ideas.

Please plan to attend the upcoming ALA Annual 2015 Conference and add the Imagineering Interest Group program to your schedule! We look forward to seeing you in San Francisco.

Breanne A. Kirsch is the current Chair of the Imagineering Interest Group as well as the Game Making Interest Group within LITA. She works as a Public Services Librarian at the University of South Carolina Upstate and is the Coordinator of Emerging Technologies. She can be contacted at bkirsch@uscupstate.edu or @breezyalli.

Categories: Library News

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