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Updated: 2 hours 51 min ago

The 2020 Census Starts in Two Weeks — Are Your Computers Ready?

10 hours 54 min ago

Post courtesy of Gavin Baker, ALA Office of Public Policy and Advocacy, Deputy Director, Public Policy and Government Relations

On March 12, millions of American households will begin receiving mailings inviting them to respond to the 2020 Census. To get an accurate count, everyone has to respond – if they don’t, our libraries and communities will lose needed funding.

As the mailings arrive, patrons may come to your library with questions – and, with a new option to respond online, to complete the questionnaire using the library’s computers or internet. To help you prepare, ALA has a new, two-page tip sheet, “Libraries and the 2020 Census: Responding to the Census,” that provides key dates, options for responding, and advice for libraries preparing for the 2020 Census. For instance, the tip sheet explains these important facts:

  • Ways to Respond: Households can respond to the Census online, by phone, or by mail from March 12 until July 31.
  • Mailings: Between March 12 and 20, the Census Bureau will send letters to most households that explain how to respond online or by phone. The Census Bureau will follow up with several reminders in March and April.
  • Paper Questionnaires: In areas with low internet connectivity, the first mailing will also include a paper questionnaire. Between April 8 and 16, the Census Bureau will send a paper questionnaire to every household that has not yet responded.
  • Household Visits: Beginning May 13, households that have not responded will receive visits from a Census Bureau employee.
  • Questionnaire Languages: The online and phone questionnaires will be available in 13 languages.
  • Online Devices: The online questionnaire will be accessible from smartphones and tablets, in addition to laptop or desktop computers.
  • Security and Confidentiality: Responses in the online questionnaire are secure and encrypted, and the confidentiality of all responses to the 2020 Census are strictly protected by law.
  • Information for Respondents: The Census Bureau provides video and written guides in multiple languages that libraries can share to assist patrons completing the Census.

In addition, the tip sheet offers suggestions for preparing library networks and computers in advance of the 2020 Census. To expand access to the online Census questionnaire, libraries can

  • Provide guest or “express” internet access for census respondents without a library card number.
  • Temporarily add or dedicate devices for 15-minute user sessions to reduce wait times for patrons completing the census.
  • Leave your Wi-Fi on in March and April when the library is closed so users can access it from the parking lot.
  • Whitelist my2020census.gov and 2020census.gov in the library’s firewall.
  • Make mobile devices available to complete the census at bookmobiles and other outreach efforts.

The upcoming Census is also a good opportunity to do a check-on the security of your library’s network and devices. To learn more, see LITA’s Library Privacy Checklist for Public Access Computers and Networks and Cybersecurity Best Practices from Census Counts.

With just weeks to go before the Census begins, ALA’s tip sheet can help your staff prepare. For additional resources about libraries and the 2020 Census, visit ala.org/census

Categories: Library News

News Regarding the Future of LITA after the Core Vote

Mon, 2020-02-24 12:35
Dear LITA members,

We’re writing about the implications of LITA’s budget for the upcoming 2020-21 fiscal year, which starts September 1, 2020. We have reviewed the budget and affirmed that LITA will need to disband if the Core vote does not succeed.

Since the Great Recession, membership in professional organizations has been declining consistently. LITA has followed the same pattern and as a result, has been running at a deficit for a number of years. Each year, LITA spends more on staff, events, equipment, software, and supplies than it takes in through memberships and event registrations. We were previously able to close our budgets through the use of our net asset balance which is, in effect, like a nest egg for the division.

Of course, that could not continue indefinitely. Our path towards sustainability has culminated in the proposal to form Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures. The new division would come with significant efficiencies for staff and programming that make it possible to continue our activities.

Starting at Midwinter 2020, we began learning about significant financial challenges at the ALA level. ALA used the net asset balances of the divisions in order to meet current expenses. In the assessment of LITA’s leadership, it is unlikely to be able to restore these funds. In forming a budget for the 2020-21 fiscal year, it is clear to LITA staff and leadership that we cannot operate without the net asset balance; it is not possible to compose a budget that both breaks even and includes the activities that make LITA, LITA.

Therefore we anticipate that fiscal year 2020-21 will be a transitional year: either completing the merger with ALCTS and LLAMA to create the new division Core, or phasing out LITA entirely. In the event that all three divisions do not vote in favor of Core, we will spend the year working through an orderly wind-down that includes transferring some key activities to other ALA units, where possible.

We regret to be the bearers of news that will surely sadden any of us who value LITA’s spirit and the friendships we’ve built within our division. We hope this will not be a surprise to longtime members, and we want to be as transparent as possible as we approach this important vote starting on March 9.

The LITA Board is fully supportive of the exciting possibility of Core, and we hope you are as well. We know this has been a disorienting time while we work towards a possible merger. We want you to know that we value your work, and we’re doing our best to make sure it will continue as part of Core. We believe the vote will pass and that we’ll spend the next year working together to expand support and resources for you to do even more in the future. We will share more details about the path we’ve chosen (including finances) after the vote.

Sincerely,
Emily G. Morton-Owens, LITA President
Bohyun Kim, LITA Past President
Evviva Weinraub Lajoie, LITA Vice President/President Elect
Lindsay Cronk, LITA Director at Large
Tabatha Farney, LITA Director at Large
Jodie Gambill, LITA Division Councilor
Amanda L. Goodman, LITA Director at Large
Margaret Heller, LITA Director at Large
Hong Ma, LITA Director at Large
Berika Williams, LITA Director at Large
Topher Lawton, LITA Parliamentarian

Categories: Library News

Boards of ALCTS, LITA and LLAMA put Core on March 2020 ballot

Thu, 2020-02-20 11:44

The Boards of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), Library Information Technology Association (LITA) and the Library Leadership & Management Association (LLAMA) have all voted unanimously to send to members their recommendation that the divisions form a new division, Core: Leadership, Infrastructure, Futures. 

ALCTS, LITA and LLAMA will vote on the recommendation during the upcoming American Library Association (ALA) election. If approved by all three memberships, and the ALA Council, the three long-time divisions will end operations on August 31, 2020, and merge into Core on September 1.

Members of the three Boards emphasized that Core will continue to support the groups in which members currently find their professional homes while also creating new opportunities to work across traditional division lines. It is also envisioned that Core would strengthen member engagement efforts and provide new career-support services. If one or more of the division memberships do not approve Core on the ballot, the three divisions will remain separate but continue to face membership declines and financial pressures.  

In order to share pertinent information and facilitate discussion regarding the possible merger, ALCTS, LITA and LLAMA will each lead separate town halls, as well as focus groups. In addition, the divisions invite feedback and discussion through Twitter using the hashtags #TheCoreQuestion and #EndorseCore. Visit the Core website for full details for all upcoming events and past Core discussions.  

Join us Monday, February 24th, 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. CST for a LITA Town Hall meeting to learn details about the ALA election vote to combine the three divisions, LITA, ALCTS, LLAMA into the new proposed division Core. The election runs March 9 – April 1, and all members of the three divisions are encouraged to vote. Register for the town hall meeting today!

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) is the national association for information providers who work in collections and technical services, such as acquisitions, cataloging, collection development, preservation and continuing resources in digital and print formats. ALCTS is a division of the American Library Association.

The Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership. The membership includes new professionals, systems librarians, library administrators, library schools, vendors and anyone else interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers.

The Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA) advances outstanding leadership and management practices in library and information services by encouraging and nurturing individual excellence in current and aspiring library leaders.

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: February 19, 2020

Wed, 2020-02-19 15:33

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

Early-bird registration ends March 1st for the Exchange

Wed, 2020-02-19 13:29

With stimulating programming, including discussion forums and virtual poster sessions, the Exchange will engage a wide range of presenters and participants, facilitating enriching conversations and learning opportunities in a three-day, fully online, virtual forum. Programming includes keynote presentations from Emily Drabinski and Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, and sessions focusing on leadership and change management, continuity and sustainability, and collaborations and cooperative endeavors. The Exchange will take place May 4, 6, and 8.

In addition to these sessions, the Exchange will offer lightning rounds and virtual poster sessions. For up-to-date details on sessions, be sure to check the Exchange website as new information is being added regularly.

Early-bird registration rates are $199 for ALCTS, LITA, and LLAMA members, $255 for ALA individual members, $289 for non-members, $79 for student members, $475 for groups, and $795 for institutions. Early-bird registration ends March 1.

Want to register your group or institution? Groups watching the event together from one access point will receive single (1) user access to the live stream over all three days and unlimited user account creation on the Exchange event site. Institutions with a maximum of six (6) concurrent user access points receive access to the live stream over all three days and unlimited user account creation on the Exchange event site.

Group and institutional members are encouraged to create their own user accounts and participate in the event’s discussions and non-streaming content. To learn more, contact ALCTS Program Officer, Tom Ferren at tferren@ala.org or call (312) 280-5038.

Interested in submitting a poster for the virtual poster session? The deadline for submitting virtual poster proposals is March 6. Learn more and submit your proposal today.

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: February 13, 2020

Thu, 2020-02-13 10:30

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

LITA Blog Call for Contributors

Wed, 2020-02-12 22:29

We’re looking for new contributors for the LITA Blog!

Do you have just a single idea for a post or a series of posts? No problem! We’re always looking for guest contributors with new ideas.

Do you have thoughts and ideas about technology in libraries that you’d like to share with LITA members? Apply to be a regular contributor!

If you’re a member of LITA, consider either becoming a regular contributor for the next year or submitting a post or two as a guest.

Apply today!

Categories: Library News

Learn the latest in Library UX with this LITA Webinar

Tue, 2020-02-11 11:51

There’s a seat waiting for you… Register for this LITA webinar today!

How to Talk About Library UX – Redux

Presenter: Michael Schofield

Librarian / Director of Engineering, WhereBy.Us

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

12:00 – 1:00 pm Central Time

The last time we did this webinar was in 2016 – and a lot’s changed. The goal then was to help establish some practical benchmarks for how to think about the user experience and UX design in libraries, which suffered from a lack of useful vocabulary and concepts: while we might be able to evangelize the importance of UX, LibUXers struggled with translating their championship into the kinds of bureaucratic goals that unlocked real budget for our initiatives.

It’s one thing to say, “the patron experience is critical!” It’s another thing to say, “the experience is critical – so pay for OptimalWorkshop, or hire a UX Librarian, or give me a department.”

And let’s be real, this is still a real obstacle. But now, there are more examples than ever about successful UX programs in libraries, models for how even whole UX departments might be structured. The hill you have to climb to pitch UX is a little less steep.

What’s changed is twofold: the collective level of UX maturity in librarianship (it’s gone up!), and the increasing pace of practical thinking in the “fields” of service design and researchOps.

This 60-minute webinar – “How to talk about UX Redux” – is benchmark 2.0.

Learning objectives for this program include:

  • Understand a higher baseline of UX, its role in the organizational mission, and its part in a larger ecosystem of “products,” services, and policies.
  • Learn a high-level working vocabulary for UX and service design.
  • Learn new insights into the practice of “researchOps,” and sound arguments for allocating more of the library budget into this kind of thinking.

This course is geared toward librarians and librarifriends who are invested — at least in spirit! — in improving the library UX. This webinar might be especially good for LibUXers who have already seen the concepts and practice of UX change weirdly and are looking for a hard reset.

View details and Register here.

Can’t attend the live event? No problem! Register and you’ll receive a link to the recording.

Categories: Library News

Joint Working Group on eBooks and Digital Content in Libraries

Mon, 2020-02-10 14:18

John Klima, the LITA Representative to the Working Group on eBooks and Digital Content, recently agreed to an interview about the latest update from ALA Midwinter 2020. Watch the blog for more updates from John about the Working Group in the coming months!

What is the mission and purpose of the Working Group on eBooks and Digital Content?

Quoting from the minutes of the ALA Executive Board Fall meeting in October of 2019:

[The purpose of this working group is] to address library concerns with publishers and content providers specifically to develop a variety of digital content license models that will allow libraries to provide content more effectively, allowing options to choose between one-at-a-time, metered, and other options to be made at point of sale; to make all content available in print and for which digital variants have been created to make the digital content equally available to libraries without moratorium or embargo; to explore all fair options for delivering content digitally in libraries; and to urge Congress to explore digital content pricing and licensing models to ensure democratic access to information.

It’s a big charge to be sure.

Can you tell us more about how the group came to be? What are the most important long-term goals for the group?

Again, paraphrasing from the minutes of the ALA Executive Board Fall meeting in October of 2019:

At the 2019 ALA Conference Council iii, the ALA Council approved a resolution calling for establishment of a Joint Working Group on eBook and Digital Content Pricing in Libraries consisting of representatives from ALA, ULC, ASGCLA, COSLA, PLA, LITA, ALCTS, RUSA, SLA and other members to be determined.

There are more than 30 members to the working group with representatives from internal ALA organizations like LITA, PLA, YALSA, ALCTS, RUSA, and more, as well as representatives from outside of ALA including people like Steve Potash from OverDrive, Brian O’Leary from the Book Industry Study Group, and Sandra DeGroote from MLA. That means there’s a lot of smart people together in a room. The group is an attempt to put together representatives of all types of libraries, patrons, and econtent vendors.

In my opinion our main long-term goal is to put together a proposal for fair delivery of content to libraries that incorporates pricing and access that can be used by libraries of all sizes when working with econtent vendors. That isn’t a simple thing, but I’m confident this group will come up with a good proposal.

What is the group working on next?

Right now our co-chairs—Leah Dunn from UNC-Asheville and Kelvin Brown from Broward County Libraries (FL)—are pulling together minutes from our Midwinter meeting which will include a concept for how the group wants to proceed with our charge and what type of deliverables we will provide to ALA at the end of our term. At this time the group is focusing on how to organize itself to best tackle our charge.

Give us an overview of your meeting during ALA Midwinter and the future of this new working group.

Something that I talked about is that since I work in a public library, I don’t necessarily know all the concerns that academic or special libraries face with regards to econtent. This was echoed by people around the table. For many public libraries the Macmillan ebook embargo has a direct impact on providing content to patrons but often academic libraries aren’t customers of Macmillan. For them the conversation needed to be about something other than just one single vendor.

As a group we agreed that we needed to learn what libraries are already doing with regards to econtent that is working for them (and thereby providing a way to share that among all libraries) and elevating the conversation above individual vendors in order to include all types of libraries and all types of patrons/users.

What else should LITA members know about this working group? How can they get involved or help?

I’ll provide an update via the blog each time we meet as a group to provide LITA members with our progress. In the meantime, LITA members can email me with their concerns about ebooks. What is working for them right now? What access do they not want to lose? Are there technological concerns that could be addressed? What types of access do they not have?

Categories: Library News

2020 Forum Call for Proposals

Fri, 2020-02-07 11:01

LITA, ALCTS and LLAMA are now accepting proposals for the 2020 Forum, November 19-21 at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, MD.

Intention and Serendipity: Exploration of Ideas through Purposeful and Chance Connections

Submission Deadline: March 30, 2020

Our library community is rich in ideas and shared experiences. The 2020 Forum Theme embodies our purpose to share knowledge and gain new insights by exploring ideas through an interactive, hands-on experience. We hope that this Forum can be an inspiration to share, finish, and be a catalyst to implement ideas…together.

We invite those who choose to lead through their ideas to submit proposals for sessions or preconference workshops, as well as nominate keynote speakers. This is an opportunity to share your ideas or unfinished work, inciting collaboration and advancing the library profession forward through meaningful dialogue.

We encourage diversity in presenters from a wide range of background, libraries, and experiences. We deliberately seek and strongly encourage submissions from underrepresented groups, such as women, people of color, the LGBTQA+ community, and people with disabilities. We also strongly encourage submissions from public, school, and special libraries.

Vendors wishing to submit a proposal should partner with a library representative who is testing/using the product.

Presenters will submit final presentation slides and/or electronic content (video, audio, etc.) to be made available online following the event. Presenters are expected to register and participate in the Forum as attendees.

For additional information about the 2020 LITA/ALCTS/LLAMA Forum, please visit https://forum.lita.org.

For questions, contact Berika Williams, Forum Planning Committee Chair, at berika.williams@tufts.edu.

Categories: Library News

LITA announces the 2020 Excellence in Children’s and Young Adult Science Fiction Notable Lists

Thu, 2020-02-06 10:51

The LITA Committee Recognizing Excellence in Children’s and Young Adult Science Fiction presents the 2020 Excellence in Children’s and Young Adult Science Fiction Notable Lists. The lists are composed of notable children’s and young adult science fiction published between November 2018 and October 2019 and organized into three age-appropriate categories. The annotated lists will be posted on the website at www.sfnotables.org.

The Golden Duck Notable Picture Books List is selected from books intended for pre-school children and very early readers, up to 6 years old. Recognition is given to the author and the illustrator:

Field Trip to the Moon by John Hare. Margaret Ferguson Books

Hello by Aiko Ikegami. Creston Books

How to be on the Moon by Viviane Schwarz. Candlewick Press

Out There by Tom Sullivan. Balzer + Bray

The Babysitter From Another Planet by Stephen Savage. Neal Porter Books

The Space Walk by Brian Biggs. Dial Books for Young Readers

Ultrabot’s First Playdate by Josh Schneider. Clarion Books

Good Boy by Sergio Ruzzier. Atheneum Books

Llama Destroys the World, written by Jonathan Stutzman, illustrated by Heather Fox. Henry Holt & Co

The Eleanor Cameron Notable Middle Grade Books List titles are chapter books or short novels that may be illustrated. They are written for ages 7 – 11. This list is named for Eleanor Cameron, author of the Mushroom Planet series.

Awesome Dog 5000 by Justin Dean. Random House Books for Young Readers 

Cog by Greg van Eekhout. HarperCollins

Field Trip (Sanity and Tallulah #2) by Molly Brooks. Disney-Hyperion 

Friendroid by M. M. Vaughan. Margaret K. McElderry Books

Klawde: Evil Alien Warlord Cat by Johnny Marciano & Emily Chenoweth. Penguin Workshop

Maximillian Fly by Angie Sage. Katherine Tegen Books

The Owls Have Come to Take Us Away by Ronald L. Smith. Clarion Books

The Greystone Secrets #1: The Strangers by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Katherine Tegen Books

We’re Not From Here by Geoff Rodkey. Crown Books for Young Readers

The Unspeakable Unknown by Eliot Sappingfield. G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers

Seventh Grade vs the Galaxy by Joshua S. Levy. Carolrhoda Books

The Hal Clement Notable Young Adult Books List contains science fiction books written for ages 12 – 18 with a young adult protagonist. This list is named for Hal Clement, a well-known science fiction writer and high school science teacher who promoted children’s science fiction.

Alien: Echo by Mira Grant. Imprint

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff. Knopf Books for Young Readers

Girls With Sharp Sticks by Suzanne Young. Simon Pulse

The Hive by Barry Lyga and Morgan Baden. Kids Can Press

The Pioneer by Bridget Tyler. HarperTeen

How We Became Wicked by Alexander Yates. Atheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books

The Waning Age by S.E. Grove. Viking Books for Young Readers

The Fever King by Victoria Lee. Skyscape

War Girls by Tochi Onyebuchi. Razorbill

I Hope You Get This Message by Farah Rishi. HarperTeen

Honor Bound by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre. Katherine Tegen Books

Contact:

Jenny Levine

Executive Director

Library and Information Technology Association

jlevine@ala.org

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: February 5, 2020

Wed, 2020-02-05 14:42

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

Teach for LITA: Submit Proposals by February 16

Mon, 2020-02-03 15:47

Reminder: The deadline to submit LITA education proposals is February 16th. Please share our CFP with your colleagues. We are seeking instructors passionate about library technology topics to share their expertise and teach a webinar, webinar series, or online course for LITA this year.

All topics related to the intersection of technology and libraries are welcomed, including:

  • Machine Learning
  • IT Project Management
  • Data Visualization
  • Javascript, including: jquery, json, d3.js
  • Library-related APIs
  • Change management in technology
  • Big Data, High Performance Computing
  • Python, R, GitHub, OpenRefine, and other programming/coding topics in a library context
  • Supporting Digital Scholarship/Humanities
  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Linked Data
  • Implementation or Participation in Open Source Technologies or Communities
  • Open Educational Resources, Creating and Providing Access to Open Ebooks and Other Educational Materials
  • Managing Technology Training
  • Diversity/Inclusion and Technology
  • Accessibility Issues and Library Technology
  • Technology in Special Libraries
  • Ethics of Library Technology (e.g., Privacy Concerns, Social Justice Implications)
  • Library/Learning Management System Integrations

Instructors receive a $500 honorarium for an online course or $150 for a webinar, split among instructors. Check out our list of current and past course offerings to see what topics have been covered recently. Be part of another slate of compelling and useful online education programs this year!

Submit your proposal today!

Questions or Comments?

For questions or comments related to teaching for LITA, contact us at lita@ala.org or (312) 280-4268.

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: January 29, 2020

Wed, 2020-01-29 16:51

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

Emily Drabinski, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich to deliver keynotes at the Exchange Virtual Forum

Tue, 2020-01-28 10:13
The Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), the Library Information Technology Association (LITA) and the Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA) have announced that Emily Drabinski and Rebekkah Smith Aldrich will deliver keynote addresses at the Exchange Virtual Forum. The theme for the Exchange is “Building the Future Together,” and it will take place on the afternoons of May 4, 6 and 8. Each day has a different focus, with day 1 exploring leadership and change management; day 2 examining continuity and sustainability; and day 3 focusing on collaborations and cooperative endeavors. Drabinski’s keynote will be on May 4, and Smith Aldrich’s will be on May 8. 

Emily Drabinski is the Critical Pedagogy Librarian at Mina Rees Library, Graduate Center, City University of New York (CUNY). She is also the liaison to the School of Labor and Urban Studies and other CUNY masters and doctoral programs. Drabinski’s research includes critical approaches to information literacy instruction, gender and sexuality in librarianship and the intersections of power and library systems and structures. She currently serves as the series editor for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies (Library Juice Press/Litwin Books). Additionally, Drabinski serves on the editorial boards of College & Research LibrariesThe Journal of Critical Library & Information Studies and Radical Teacher, a socialist, feminist and anti-racist journal devoted to the theory and practice of teaching. Drabinski has given numerous keynote addresses and presentations at the Big XII Teaching and Learning Conference, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference and the Digital Library Federation.

Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, a powerful advocate for public libraries, is the executive director of the Mid-Hudson Library System (MHLS) in Hudson, New York. In addition, she is a certified sustainable building advisor (CSBA) and is a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional (LEED AP). Smith Aldrich holds an advanced certificate in Public Library Administration from the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University, where she is also an adjunct professor. She is a founding member of ALA’s Sustainability Roundtable and helped to pass the ALA Resolution on the Importance of Sustainable Libraries in 2015. Smith Aldrich was named a Library Journal Mover and Shaker in 2010 and writes a sustainability column for the journal. A prolific writer, Smith Aldrich is the author of Sustainable Thinking: Ensuring Your Library’s Future in an Uncertain World. She has also contributed chapters to Better Library Design (Rowman and Littlefield) and The Green Library (Library Juice Press). Like Drabinski, Smith Aldrich has given numerous presentations and keynote addresses at venues that include IFLA, the Association of Rural and Small Libraries Conference, the US Embassy in Peru, the American Library Association Annual Conference and the New York Library Association Conference. 

The Exchange is presented by the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) and the Library Leadership & Management Association (LLAMA), divisions of the American Library Association. To get more information about the proposed future for joint projects such as the Exchange, join the conversation about #TheCoreQuestion.

Contact:
Brooke Morris-Chott
Program Officer, Communications
ALCTS
bmorris@ala.org
Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: January 22, 2020

Wed, 2020-01-22 13:59

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

Advice for the New Systems Librarian – Building Relationships 2.0

Fri, 2020-01-17 09:00

Advice for the New Systems Librarian – Building Relationships, Part 2

Previous articles in this series: Building Relationships, Helpful Resources, A Day in the Life

I am at the two-year mark of being in my role as systems librarian at Jacksonville University, and I continue to love what I do. I am working on larger-scale projects and continuing to learn new things every week. There has not been a challenge or new skill to learn yet that I have been afraid of.

Image: 3D Team Success by ccPixs.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

My first post in this series highlighted groups and departments that may be helpful in learning your new role. Now that I’m a little more seasoned, I have had the opportunity to work with even more departments and individuals at my institution on various projects. Some of these departments may be unique to me, but I would imagine you would find counterparts where you work.

The Academic Technology (AT) department. This department is responsible for classroom technology, online and hybrid course software, and generally any technology that enhances student learning. In the last year, I have worked with AT on finding and working with a vendor for new technology for OPAC access and developing a digital media lab within the library. I have worked with almost every individual in this department at this writing. Many of them have technology experience that surpasses mine, so I soak up all that I can when there is an opportunity to learn from them. So far, my friends in AT have taught me more about accessibility, various hardware, and technology installation.

Faculty. I work with faculty in my role as a subject liaison and to teach information literacy classes, but I have recently worked with faculty on setting up specific databases. A recent database-linking project required participation from the library and IT for different access points. The faculty member had not worked on such a project before, so it was an excellent chance to flex my growing systems muscle to explain the library’s role in the process. I also work with faculty on linking electronic resources from our catalog in Blackboard and Canva. These activities are excellent ways to not only build relationships with faculty, but also communicate the variety of resources available to faculty.

Center for Teaching and Learning. Speaking of faculty and communication, get to know your institution’s hub for faculty teaching and learning. Our Center for Teaching and Learning hosts workshops and lectures for new and seasoned faculty. Developing a relationship with this department affords the opportunity to grow faculty knowledge about library technology and what it can do for them and their students. I am in the planning stages of developing a workshop to show faculty how to use the digital media lab mentioned above. For new faculty, find out if there is a new faculty orientation and see if you can present about the library’s website, electronic resources, or anything that may fall under your realm of responsibilities. For me, I am more behind-the-scenes than I used to be in my previous position, so it is nice to be visible and let people meet the person behind the name that may pop up in their e-mail.

The marketing department (again). I’m repeating my mention of the marketing department because of social media. I manage my library’s social media presence, and my institution’s marketing department has been an asset when it comes to social media. Find out if there are social media trainings to enhance your knowledge of social media platforms. Are you using the right platforms to reach your audience? Are there specific hashtags you should be using? Make sure you know your institution’s brand and that you are developing content that aligns with the brand.

I remain a department of one in my library, but it continues to take a village to accomplish all the things.

What other departments are important to supporting the needs of a library’s systems department?

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: January 15, 2020

Wed, 2020-01-15 15:19

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

LITA Education Call for Proposals for 2020

Fri, 2020-01-10 10:58

What library technology topics are you passionate about? Have something you can help others learn?

LITA invites you to share your expertise with a national audience! Our courses and webinars are based on topics of interest to library technology workers and technology managers at all levels in all types of libraries. Taught by experts, they reach beyond physical conferences to bring high quality continuing education to the library world.

We deliberately seek and strongly encourage submissions from underrepresented groups, such as women, people of color, the LGBTQA+ community, and people with disabilities.

Submit a proposal by February 16th to teach a webinar, webinar series, or online course for Winter/Spring/Summer/Fall 2020.

All topics related to the intersection of technology and libraries are welcomed, including:

  • Machine Learning
  • IT Project Management
  • Data Visualization
  • Javascript, including: jquery, json, d3.js
  • Library-related APIs
  • Change management in technology
  • Big Data, High Performance Computing
  • Python, R, GitHub, OpenRefine, and other programming/coding topics in a library context
  • Supporting Digital Scholarship/Humanities
  • Virtual and Augmented Reality
  • Linked Data
  • Implementation or Participation in Open Source Technologies or Communities
  • Open Educational Resources, Creating and Providing Access to Open Ebooks and Other Educational Materials
  • Managing Technology Training
  • Diversity/Inclusion and Technology
  • Accessibility Issues and Library Technology
  • Technology in Special Libraries
  • Ethics of Library Technology (e.g., Privacy Concerns, Social Justice Implications)
  • Library/Learning Management System Integrations

Instructors receive a $500 honorarium for an online course or $150 for a webinar, split among instructors. Check out our list of current and past course offerings to see what topics have been covered recently. Be part of another slate of compelling and useful online education programs this year!

Questions or Comments?

For questions or comments related to teaching for LITA, contact us at (312) 280-4268 or lita@ala.org

Categories: Library News

Jobs in Information Technology: January 8, 2020

Wed, 2020-01-08 13:26

New this week

Visit the LITA Jobs Site for additional job listings and information on submitting your own job posting.

Categories: Library News

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